Nova Scotia

Characteristics

According to the 2016 census, 95,380 members of Nova Scotia’s Acadian and Francophone community can speak French. Nearly 6% of the 26,456 residents whose mother tongue is French are immigrants. The Fête de la Mi-Carême, a mid-Lenten festival with strong roots in Acadian history, is a very popular celebration in Nova Scotia.

Organization representing the Francophone population

The Fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse, founded in 1968, is a not-for-profit organization with a mission to promote the vitality and overall development of Nova Scotia’s Acadian and Francophone community. It is the main representative of the province’s Acadians and Francophones, and it facilitates cooperation and partnership among its member organizations, offering services and programs designed for their needs.

Logo Fédération culturelle acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Immigration

After Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s Francophone Minority Communities Steering Committee released its Strategic Framework to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities in 2003, the Fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse piloted a project on Francophone immigration to Nova Scotia. Immigration Francophone Nouvelle-Écosse is pursuing the objective to increase the number of French-speaking newcomers to Nova Scotia, encourage them to stay, foster their settlement in the province—specifically in Acadian and Francophone communities—and increase the reception and settlement capacity of Nova Scotia’s Acadian and Francophone communities.

Tourism

After Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s Francophone Minority Communities Steering Committee released its Strategic Framework to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities in 2003, the Fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse piloted a project on Francophone immigration to Nova Scotia. Immigration Francophone Nouvelle-Écosse is pursuing the objective to increase the number of French-speaking newcomers to Nova Scotia, encourage them to stay, foster their settlement in the province—specifically in Acadian and Francophone communities—and increase the reception and settlement capacity of Nova Scotia’s Acadian and Francophone communities.

Immersion in French as a second language

The Association canadienne des professeurs d’immersion (ACPI) is present in Nova Scotia. Its mission is to guide immersive education by providing extensive support and professional learning opportunities to educators, as well as inspiring educational dialogue in French.